• Create and Learn

11 Cognitive Biases That Influence Political Outcomes



This article is published in collaboration with Visual Capitalist

by Marcus Lu


Cognitive Biases in the Political Arena


With the 2020 U.S. presidential election fast approaching, many people will be glued to the 24-hour news cycle to stay up to date on political developments. Yet, when searching for facts, our own cognitive biases often get in the way.


If this isn’t problematic enough, third parties can also take advantage of these biases to influence our thinking. The media, for example, can exploit our tendency to assign stereotypes to others by only providing catchy, surface-level information. Once established in our minds, these generalizations can be tough to shake off.


Such tactics can have a powerful influence on public opinion if applied consistently to a broad audience. To help us avoid these mental pitfalls, today’s infographic from PredictIt lists common cognitive biases that influence the realm of politics, beginning with the “Big Cs”.


The First C: Confirmation Bias


People exhibit confirmation bias when they seek information that only affirms their pre-existing beliefs. This can cause them to become overly rigid in their political opinions, even when presented with conflicting ideas or evidence.


When too many people fall victim to this bias, progress towards solving complex sociopolitical issues is thwarted. That’s because solving these issues in a bipartisan system requires cooperation from both sides of the spectrum.


A reluctance towards establishing a common ground is already widespread in America. According to a 2019 survey, 70% of Democrats believed their party’s leaders should “stand up” to President Trump, even if less gets done in Washington. Conversely, 51% of Republicans believed that Trump should “stand up” to Democrats.


In light of these developments, researchers have conducted studies to determine if the issue of confirmation bias is as prevalent as it seems. In one experiment, participants chose to either support or oppose a given sociopolitical issue. They were then presented with evidence that was conflicting, affirming, or a combination of both.


In all scenarios, participants were most likely to stick with their initial decisions. Of those presented with conflicting evidence, just one in five changed their stance. Furthermore, participants who maintained their initial positions became even more confident in the superiority of their decision—a testament to how influential confirmation bias can be.


The Second C: Coverage Bias


Coverage bias, in the context of politics, is a form of media bias where certain politicians or topics are disproportionately covered. In some cases, media outlets can even twist stories to fit a certain narrative.


For example, research from the University of South Florida analyzed media coverage on President Trump’s 2017 travel ban. It was discovered that primetime media hosts covered the ban through completely different perspectives.


Start learning Data Science and Business Intelligence tools:


#createandlearn#analytics#dashboard#finance#accounting#tableau#powerbi#excel#sales#datascience#businessintelligence

Power BI Academy: HR Recruitment

Create a complete dashboard for Human Resources. Bonus: 10 Templates

Excel Easy: Dashboards

Made Simple

Few pages, quick steps, and professional dashboards

Power BI – Business Intelligence Clinic

One dataset multiple solutions. Start your journey into the Business Intelligence world with this book.

Power BI 2019.jpg

Tableau – Business Intelligence Clinic

One dataset multiple solutions. Start your journey into the Business Intelligence world with this book.

Tableau ebook 2019.jpg

Power BI, Excel and Tableau – BI Clinic

Learn how to create Dashboard using Power BI, Excel and Tableau.

BI Clinic Complete Single cover.jpg

Excel – Business Intelligence Clinic

One dataset multiple solutions. Start your journey into the Business Intelligence world with this book.

Excel BI ebook 2019.jpg

For any inquiries, please contact us:

© Brain Words